Saline Reporter > News

SALINE: Graduating senior to continue swimming at Naval Academy

Saline High School senior Michael Bundas in Downtown Saline. Bundas has been accepted to the United States Naval Academy and will continue his swimming career there.

For many years, Saline High school senior Michael Bundas has felt at home in the water.

As a member of the school’s record-setting swim team, Bundas spent countless hours in the pool perfecting his craft. So perhaps it’s fitting that in a few short weeks, he will join the ranks of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. and embark on a nine-year adventure that will eventually lead him out to vast, open water.

Yet before Bundas could start packing his bags, he had to go through a rather lengthy application process, one featuring tests of both academic and physical proficiency. This all began late last summer.

“My entire application was done in October, so there’s an application online for the recommendations and basic information, then you have your senator nominations,” he said. “You have to have senators and congressman (recommend you) in order to get nominated and that’s another three more applications.”

Just before came the athletically-inclined portion of the entrance evaluation, which Bundas said he enjoyed tremendously and was able to get accomplished when he first visited the Annapolis campus for a tour last August.

“There was the fitness assessment, which is like a fitness test. There was a summer seminar program,” Bundas said. “It was a five day-long camp, if you will. I got to go on a tour, and that’s when I actually took the tests.”

Bundas said he had a couple of schools on his list other than the Naval Academy, including the University of Michigan where he was also accepted, but said spending his college years in Annapolis was his top choice.

He said he is excited to get away from home, but not because of any feelings of rebellion or animosity some young people have as they exit high school.

“It wasn’t that I wanted to leave. I know a lot of kids go to college thinking, ‘I just want to get away from my parents,’” Bundas said. “I’m just excited to go around and travel places.”

While Bundas is certain to be extremely busy with the military component of his new daily routine, he is not taking the easy route in terms of his academic course of study. Continued...

“I didn’t get accepted for engineering, but I think I will go with a major in engineering,” he said. “I’m thinking mechanical or nuclear, so I guess it just depends on what I end up liking.”

Whatever he ends up studying, Bundas said he knew the Naval Academy was the right school for him from the moment he stepped on campus, even though attending there means a commitment to serve in the Navy for five years once his education is completed.

“It’s the atmosphere, it’s amazing. I mean you walk around campus and everyone’s in their uniforms and everything just looks neat, nice and in order,” he said. “All the halls are amazing and well kept.”

Additionally, Bundas said he will be able to keep up with his favorite sport in Annapolis, which he developed a fondness for while a youngster in Saline.

“I’ll be swimming,” he said. “I talked to the coach and he said he really liked me, and so I will report to swim there.”

Bundas said his passion for swimming is at least partially responsible for turning him into the young man that he is today. It will also likely be the enduring legacy he leaves behind in Saline, given the pinnacle of success he and his fellow SHS swim colleagues have enjoyed.

Bundas first took to the water at a young age.

“I started when I was probably about 11, I think,” he said, mentioning his sister, also a swimmer, as his initial influence. “I was like an average football, basketball, baseball player, and I so I just kind of got sucked into swimming.”

But Bundas said swimming as a pastime rather quickly turned into swimming as a passion while competing in a local youth league. “

“I swam (Saline) Stingrays and swam about two seasons a year,” he said, “and then once it got to middle school, high school, I started swimming with the high school team.” Continued...

When asked what is so compelling to him about swimming, Bundas quickly said, “competition.”

“It’s very different because it’s probably the most time consuming sport, and committed sport, at least in high school,” he said. “So it’s just really like a fun way to work at something.”

The passion Bundas shared with his fellow swimmers, along with expert guidance provided by Coach Todd Brunty manifested in a fantastic season this year.

“This brotherhood that you build, I couldn’t have asked for anything more,” Bundas said, citing the biggest goal of any season is to try and win states, although he admitted to loftier ambitions. “It was always in the back of our heads that we could break a national record. Throughout the season we were all busting our butts, I guess, and trying to be the best that we could be.”

The hard work paid off in Holland, MI on March 8, when Bundas along with David Boland, Josh Ehrman and Adam Whitener set a national public high school record for the 200 medley relay.

“We broke prelims by a 100th of a second,” he said. “It was 130.26 on the prelims, then 130.01 on finals, so we re-broke it.”

Though Bundas played a large part in bringing the national record home, he downplays his own role, while talking up his teammates as well as SHS.

“A big part of why we did it was to bring some respect to our school and our state, for swimming at least,” he said. “And then it’s also just an accomplishment for a team to do that, so I think it brings a good reputation for Saline.”

When Bundas talks about his success outside of the pool, academically and otherwise, he is quick to deflect praise as well.

The question came up as to Bundas’ biggest influences, and without having to think he said, “Both of my parents for sure, my dad and my mom. I couldn’t have done any of this stuff without my mom and dad taking an active role.”
For many years, Saline High school senior Michael Bundas has felt at home in the water.

As a member of the school’s record-setting swim team, Bundas spent countless hours in the pool perfecting his craft. So perhaps it’s fitting that in a few short weeks, he will join the ranks of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. and embark on a nine-year adventure that will eventually lead him out to vast, open water.

Yet before Bundas could start packing his bags, he had to go through a rather lengthy application process, one featuring tests of both academic and physical proficiency. This all began late last summer.

“My entire application was done in October, so there’s an application online for the recommendations and basic information, then you have your senator nominations,” he said. “You have to have senators and congressman (recommend you) in order to get nominated and that’s another three more applications.”

Just before came the athletically-inclined portion of the entrance evaluation, which Bundas said he enjoyed tremendously and was able to get accomplished when he first visited the Annapolis campus for a tour last August.

“There was the fitness assessment, which is like a fitness test. There was a summer seminar program,” Bundas said. “It was a five day-long camp, if you will. I got to go on a tour, and that’s when I actually took the tests.”

Bundas said he had a couple of schools on his list other than the Naval Academy, including the University of Michigan where he was also accepted, but said spending his college years in Annapolis was his top choice.

He said he is excited to get away from home, but not because of any feelings of rebellion or animosity some young people have as they exit high school.

“It wasn’t that I wanted to leave. I know a lot of kids go to college thinking, ‘I just want to get away from my parents,’” Bundas said. “I’m just excited to go around and travel places.”

While Bundas is certain to be extremely busy with the military component of his new daily routine, he is not taking the easy route in terms of his academic course of study.

“I didn’t get accepted for engineering, but I think I will go with a major in engineering,” he said. “I’m thinking mechanical or nuclear, so I guess it just depends on what I end up liking.”

Whatever he ends up studying, Bundas said he knew the Naval Academy was the right school for him from the moment he stepped on campus, even though attending there means a commitment to serve in the Navy for five years once his education is completed.

“It’s the atmosphere, it’s amazing. I mean you walk around campus and everyone’s in their uniforms and everything just looks neat, nice and in order,” he said. “All the halls are amazing and well kept.”

Additionally, Bundas said he will be able to keep up with his favorite sport in Annapolis, which he developed a fondness for while a youngster in Saline.

“I’ll be swimming,” he said. “I talked to the coach and he said he really liked me, and so I will report to swim there.”

Bundas said his passion for swimming is at least partially responsible for turning him into the young man that he is today. It will also likely be the enduring legacy he leaves behind in Saline, given the pinnacle of success he and his fellow SHS swim colleagues have enjoyed.

Bundas first took to the water at a young age.

“I started when I was probably about 11, I think,” he said, mentioning his sister, also a swimmer, as his initial influence. “I was like an average football, basketball, baseball player, and I so I just kind of got sucked into swimming.”

But Bundas said swimming as a pastime rather quickly turned into swimming as a passion while competing in a local youth league. “

“I swam (Saline) Stingrays and swam about two seasons a year,” he said, “and then once it got to middle school, high school, I started swimming with the high school team.”

When asked what is so compelling to him about swimming, Bundas quickly said, “competition.”

“It’s very different because it’s probably the most time consuming sport, and committed sport, at least in high school,” he said. “So it’s just really like a fun way to work at something.”

The passion Bundas shared with his fellow swimmers, along with expert guidance provided by Coach Todd Brunty manifested in a fantastic season this year.

“This brotherhood that you build, I couldn’t have asked for anything more,” Bundas said, citing the biggest goal of any season is to try and win states, although he admitted to loftier ambitions. “It was always in the back of our heads that we could break a national record. Throughout the season we were all busting our butts, I guess, and trying to be the best that we could be.”

The hard work paid off in Holland, MI on March 8, when Bundas along with David Boland, Josh Ehrman and Adam Whitener set a national public high school record for the 200 medley relay.

“We broke prelims by a 100th of a second,” he said. “It was 130.26 on the prelims, then 130.01 on finals, so we re-broke it.”

Though Bundas played a large part in bringing the national record home, he downplays his own role, while talking up his teammates as well as SHS.

“A big part of why we did it was to bring some respect to our school and our state, for swimming at least,” he said. “And then it’s also just an accomplishment for a team to do that, so I think it brings a good reputation for Saline.”

When Bundas talks about his success outside of the pool, academically and otherwise, he is quick to deflect praise as well.

The question came up as to Bundas’ biggest influences, and without having to think he said, “Both of my parents for sure, my dad and my mom. I couldn’t have done any of this stuff without my mom and dad taking an active role.”

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