Life

CONCERT PREVIEW: Lady Gaga's latest Born This Way Ball to hit the Palace stage Feb. 16

Lady Gaga may call her latest tour the Born This Way Ball, but she still considers it a Monster.

It was her second headlining tour, but Gaga ascended to global superstar status with the Monster Ball Tour, which grossed a reported $227.4 million and played to 2.5 million fans -- who Gaga has dubbed her Little Monsters -- in 201 shows. The Born This Way Ball, another audio-visual extravaganza that  launched late last April, is certainly its own creature, but Gaga says it comes from the same place as its predecessor. 

"What's most important to me is that the spirit of the Monster Ball is not dead," explains Gaga, 26, who was born who was born Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta in New York. She attended parochial school and, briefly, Tisch School of the Arts at New York University before scoring the first of her 11 Top 10 hits with "Just Dance" in 2008. 

"The Monster Ball kind of lives on through the new show, and...the Monster Ball is what my tour is always called -- we just do sort of evolving variations on this theme, sort of beautiful idea of all of the fan getting together and rejoicing in their identities, which is what the Monster Ball is all about."

The Born This Way Ball -- which Gaga calls an "electro-metal pop-opera" with its five acts, 14 costumes and 12 dancers --, is ostensibly supporting "Born this Way," Gaga's third album. It debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in May of 2011, is double-platinum in the U.S. and has sold six million copies worldwide. That gives Gaga a career total of more than 23 albums and 64 million singles sold worldwide, and she was the first celebrity to gain 10 million followers on Twitter. 

Gaga has used that platform to start philanthropic initiatives (her Born This Way Foundation for youth empowerment) and activism for environmental causes, LGBT rights and the battle against HIV and AIDS. But when it comes to music, her goal is pretty straightforward.

"I wanted to write hit songs that I knew my fans would all love and want to dance to at night clubs and on the radio and party with their friends," Gaga explains. And with "Born This Way" in particular, she "wanted to sort of refute the idea of being a trend and start to procure my legacy as a musician. The overarching theme and concept of the record is that I'm a woman in a moment of journey that is eternal. It's sort of a journey through my psychology and how the fame has affected my life." 

She certainly connected again with "Born This Way," with four Top 10 singles (the title track went to No. 1). Appropriately enough, the album was written on the road during the Monster Ball Tour. "I just received so much love and inspiration from the fans every night...and We just soared down the highway and made records," she recalls. 

She also continued to poke and provoke her audiences with the project. Some critics dubbed the "Born This Way" song a knock-off of Madonna's "Express Yourself" (Madonna herself agreed). The video for "Judas" offended some with its racially and religiously charged surrealism. And on the road, some Islamic and Muslim followers objected to the show's content -- forcing her to cancel one show in Jakarta, Indonesia -- while others have criticized Gaga's continued use of an outfit that brandishes machine gun turrets from her breasts to be problematic in the wake of the Sandy Hook shootings. 

The Who's Pete Townshend, nevertheless, saluted Gaga as "an iconic figure who is someone we can get inside. She's a story and it's fascinating to watch. She's like a space oddity."  Continued...

Gaga embraces all of that, of course. "I want to make people think and debate -- and grow to respect each other," she explains. Meanwhile, she's busy with a variety of new projects, including her third album, ARTPOP, which is expected out this fall, and her debut film appearance in director Robert Rodriguez's upcoming action drama "Machete Kills." She was also a special guest at the Rolling Stones' final 50th anniversary concert during December in New Jersey, singing "Gimme Shelter," and her collaboration with Tony Bennett on his 2011 "Duets II" album inspired the two singers to make a jazz album together, which should be out this year or some time in 2014.

"It's going to really reaffirm that she's one of the best jazz singers that anyone's ever heard," Bennett promises.

And all of this, Gaga adds, are other parts of the Monster she's created during the past five-plus years.

"It's essentially like a painting," she explains, "so I don't want to make a new painting. I just want to create the next in the series, if that makes any sense. The most exciting thing is when I go out into the audience every night and I imagine myself singing the new music and seeing the fans jumping and screaming and enjoying themselves.

"That's what I truly live for."

Lady Gaga, Madeon and Lady Starlight perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Palace, Lapeer Road at I-75, Auburn Hills. Some tickets remain from $52.50-$178, and for Club 300. Call 248-377-0100 or visit www.palacenet.com.
Lady Gaga may call her latest tour the Born This Way Ball, but she still considers it a Monster.

It was her second headlining tour, but Gaga ascended to global superstar status with the Monster Ball Tour, which grossed a reported $227.4 million and played to 2.5 million fans -- who Gaga has dubbed her Little Monsters -- in 201 shows. The Born This Way Ball, another audio-visual extravaganza that  launched late last April, is certainly its own creature, but Gaga says it comes from the same place as its predecessor. 

"What's most important to me is that the spirit of the Monster Ball is not dead," explains Gaga, 26, who was born who was born Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta in New York. She attended parochial school and, briefly, Tisch School of the Arts at New York University before scoring the first of her 11 Top 10 hits with "Just Dance" in 2008. 

"The Monster Ball kind of lives on through the new show, and...the Monster Ball is what my tour is always called -- we just do sort of evolving variations on this theme, sort of beautiful idea of all of the fan getting together and rejoicing in their identities, which is what the Monster Ball is all about."

The Born This Way Ball -- which Gaga calls an "electro-metal pop-opera" with its five acts, 14 costumes and 12 dancers --, is ostensibly supporting "Born this Way," Gaga's third album. It debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in May of 2011, is double-platinum in the U.S. and has sold six million copies worldwide. That gives Gaga a career total of more than 23 albums and 64 million singles sold worldwide, and she was the first celebrity to gain 10 million followers on Twitter. 

Gaga has used that platform to start philanthropic initiatives (her Born This Way Foundation for youth empowerment) and activism for environmental causes, LGBT rights and the battle against HIV and AIDS. But when it comes to music, her goal is pretty straightforward.

"I wanted to write hit songs that I knew my fans would all love and want to dance to at night clubs and on the radio and party with their friends," Gaga explains. And with "Born This Way" in particular, she "wanted to sort of refute the idea of being a trend and start to procure my legacy as a musician. The overarching theme and concept of the record is that I'm a woman in a moment of journey that is eternal. It's sort of a journey through my psychology and how the fame has affected my life." 

She certainly connected again with "Born This Way," with four Top 10 singles (the title track went to No. 1). Appropriately enough, the album was written on the road during the Monster Ball Tour. "I just received so much love and inspiration from the fans every night...and We just soared down the highway and made records," she recalls. 

She also continued to poke and provoke her audiences with the project. Some critics dubbed the "Born This Way" song a knock-off of Madonna's "Express Yourself" (Madonna herself agreed). The video for "Judas" offended some with its racially and religiously charged surrealism. And on the road, some Islamic and Muslim followers objected to the show's content -- forcing her to cancel one show in Jakarta, Indonesia -- while others have criticized Gaga's continued use of an outfit that brandishes machine gun turrets from her breasts to be problematic in the wake of the Sandy Hook shootings. 

The Who's Pete Townshend, nevertheless, saluted Gaga as "an iconic figure who is someone we can get inside. She's a story and it's fascinating to watch. She's like a space oddity." 

Gaga embraces all of that, of course. "I want to make people think and debate -- and grow to respect each other," she explains. Meanwhile, she's busy with a variety of new projects, including her third album, ARTPOP, which is expected out this fall, and her debut film appearance in director Robert Rodriguez's upcoming action drama "Machete Kills." She was also a special guest at the Rolling Stones' final 50th anniversary concert during December in New Jersey, singing "Gimme Shelter," and her collaboration with Tony Bennett on his 2011 "Duets II" album inspired the two singers to make a jazz album together, which should be out this year or some time in 2014.

"It's going to really reaffirm that she's one of the best jazz singers that anyone's ever heard," Bennett promises.

And all of this, Gaga adds, are other parts of the Monster she's created during the past five-plus years.

"It's essentially like a painting," she explains, "so I don't want to make a new painting. I just want to create the next in the series, if that makes any sense. The most exciting thing is when I go out into the audience every night and I imagine myself singing the new music and seeing the fans jumping and screaming and enjoying themselves.

"That's what I truly live for."

Lady Gaga, Madeon and Lady Starlight perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Palace, Lapeer Road at I-75, Auburn Hills. Some tickets remain from $52.50-$178, and for Club 300. Call 248-377-0100 or visit www.palacenet.com.

ADVERTISEMENT


Comments

The following are comments from the readers. In no way do they represent the view of Heritage Newspapers.

Login To Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

*Member ID:
*Password:
Remember login?
(requires cookies)
  Forgot Your Password?
 

Not Registered? Sign up today for free!

Do not use usernames or passwords from your financial accounts!

Note: Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required!

*Create a Member ID:
*Choose a password:
*Re-enter password:
*E-mail Address:
*Year of Birth:
 

(children under 13 cannot register)

*First Name:
*Last Name:
Company:
Home Phone:
Business Phone:
*Address:
*City:
*State:
*Zip Code:
 


Social Wire

National Life Videos



Recent Activity on Facebook



Blog Center

ryan

Ryan the Movie Critic

Ryan Michaels, 14 years old, presents columns, lists, and reviews. He has reviewed over 90 movies since he started writing for our local papers, during summer 2007.

More Blogs

MI Central Blog Center